Vegetable Planting Guide by Month for South Florida Gardeners

Gardens can be planted year-round in Florida, but fall is the preferred seed-planting season. Below is a planting guide published by the University of Florida/IFAS with recommendations for vegetable planting by month.

Many factors influence the productivity of a garden -including; soil quality, water, drainage, amount of available sunlight, nutrients and integrated pest management. We’ll explore some of these in later posts. Happy Planting!

January

February

March

April

May

June

BeetsBroccoli

Cabbage

Carrots

Cauliflower

Collards

Corn

Chinese Cabbage

Endive

English & Southern Peas

Escarole

Eggplant

Kohlrabi

Lettuce

Lima, Pole, & Bush Beans

Mustard

Onions

Parsley

Peppers

Potatoes

Radish

Spinach

Summer & Winter Squash

Tomatoes

Turnips

BeetsCantaloupes

Carrots

Collards

Corn

Cucumbers

Eggplant

English & Southern Peas

Kohlrabi

Lima, Pole, & Bush Beans

Mustard

Onions

Okra

Peppers

Radish

Summer & Winter Squash

Sweet Corn

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes

Turnips

Watermelon

CantaloupesCucumbers

Corn

Lima, Pole, & Bush Beans

Mustard

Onions

Okra

Peas (Southern)

Peppers

Radish

Summer Squash

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes

Watermelon

Lima, Pole & Bush BeansSweet Potatoes

Peas (Southern)

Black-Eyed Peas

Sweet Potatoes

Watermelon

Cassava

Chayote

Cherry Tomatoes

Chinese Yams

Malanga

Pigeon Pea

Pumpkin

Sweet Potatoes

July

August

September

October

November

December

CassavaChayote

Malanga

Summer Squash

Yard Long Beans

CantaloupesCarrots

Collards

Corn

Eggplant

Escarole

Lima & Pole Beans

Mustard

Onions

Okra

Peppers

Potatoes

Radish

Summer Spinach

Summer Squash

Tomatoes (larger fruit varieties)

Watermelon

BroccoliCabbage

Cantaloupes

Collards

Corn

Cucumber

Eggplant

Endive

English & Southern Peas

Lettuce

Lima, Pole, & Bush Beans

Onions

Okra

Parsley

Peppers

Potatoes

Tomatoes (larger fruit varieties)

Summer & Winter Squash

Watermelon

BeetsBroccoli

Cabbage

Carrots

Cauliflower

Collards

Corn

Cucumber

Eggplant

Endive

English & Southern Peas

Escarole

Kohlrabi

Lettuce

Lima , Pole, & Bush Beans

Mustard

Onions

Parsley

Peppers

Potatoes

Radish

Spinach

Strawberries

Summer Squash

Tomatoes (larger fruit varieties)

Turnips

BeetsBroccoli

Cabbage (regular & Chinese)

Carrots

Cauliflower

Collards

Corn

Cucumber

Endive

English & Southern Peas

Escarole

Kohlrabi

Lettuce

Lima, Pole, & Bush Beans

Mustard

Onions

Parsley

Peppers

Potatoes

Radish

Spinach

Strawberries

Tomatoes (larger fruit varieties)

Turnips

BroccoliCabbage

Carrots

Cauliflower

Chinese Cabbage

Collards

Corn

Cucumber

Endive

English & Southern Peas

Escarole

Eggplant

Kohlrabi

Lettuce

Lima, Pole, & Bush Beans

Mustard

Onions

Parsley

Peppers

Potatoes

Radish

Spinach

Strawberries

Tomatoes (larger fruit varieties)

Turnips

This book is by James Stephens, a professor in horticultural studies at the University of Florida. It is well illustrated and an excellent reference guide for vegetable gardening in Florida.

 

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18 comments

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  • Silvia Gamber

    This is an excellent guide to follow. I would like to know if there are classes of organic gardening that I can take close to my area. I live in Hollywood Florida. I would like to turn my back yard into my little farm.

  • Hello Sylvia: Congratulations on your plan to turn the back yard into a farm. You might want to call the Master Gardeners at the Fort Lauderdale IFAS Extension office to ask if they have resources for you also. (954) 577-6300.

    From my end, Karin is a good resource, you can reach here here: http://theediblegardeninggal.com/contact.html

    I’d try to add as many tropical fruit plants as possible. There are so many kinds of yummy Brazilian cherries, mysore raspberries, avocado, mango, citrus and may other interesting fruits. It’s a plan for me to blog more about this but I’m so busy with work and climate education right now. Please visit Roxie at the garden shop at Sears in Plantation. She can tell you everything about tropical fruit. She and her son lease the space from Sears, so it is her business. She was my go to gal when I lived in South FL. http://www.wondergardens.biz/

    And my final suggestion, larval and nectar butterfly plants will give you beautiful butterflies who will increase your yields through pollination. Roxie can help there. Also the garden shop at the Sears in Pompano specializes in butterfly plants (but Roxie knows best for tropical fruit). http://www.donnasgardengate.com/donnasgardengate.com/Roots.html

    Happy planting Silvia!!

  • Laura G

    DO you have any similar suggestions in the Kendall/Miami area? I’m in Miami and would like to start a vegetable garden. I don’t have a large yard, so I have to keep it simple. I’d also like to add some fruit trees. I want to make it all organic. Can you offer some contacts in Kendall?

  • CaptTurbo

    The Month of June seems to be missing. I’m trying to decide if I should try to plant some summer squash (yellow) and eggplant seeds. I have okra seedlings going and huge collard plants that are still powering along as the heat and rains come on.

  • According to the first link below, eggplant will last for the summer. Several of the articles list vegetables to try in FL for summer. I never had any luck with squash there and I think that in general it would be too buggy and susceptible to mildew. But you can try Cuban calabaza, as that will generally grow in the summer and is a type of squash. I was in Broward on April 2, on a day when it hit 100 degrees F in the shade so all bets are off as to seasonality. In general, I would think hardier the better. I will try to do an update here soon. It’s finally warm this week in Santa Fe, NM where I live now and I am busy getting my summer garden in. Good luck.
    Growing Eggplant in FL Summer
    FL Summer Vegetables
    Perennial SW FL Veggies from ECHO
    Miami Dade IFAS Summer Vegetable Resources

  • Best to call the UF/IFAS office in Miami-Dade (Homestead).
    http://miami-dade.ifas.ufl.edu/contact_us.shtml

    And check out Fruit and Spice Park there also. I’ve gotten so many goodies there over the years.
    http://www.fruitandspicepark.org/

  • Ana Maria

    Hi Laura G. you can ck-out Tropical park Famers Market on Bird Rd. Saturdays ask for farmer Fred he & his wife have a real working farm in So. Dade and we are moving our tropical jungle to Homestead and start our beehive’s & planting this season you can call me at 786-499-5119 for info. or Southwest community Farmers market on Facebook 😉

  • Gregory Chouinard

    i love doing veggie gardens. i have a hard time controlling the weeds. Since i have messed up mu back pretty bad i was thinking of restructuring my garden to a raised garden. Any suggestions on that ? Also my two young boys want to try their luck for the first time. Any suggestions on what they should try out that will hopefully keep them interested in gardens ? Thanks Greg

  • Diane H

    Thank you all for the great info here! We live in Delray Beach, and have a major iguana problem, they have killed a hibiscus tree, mulberry tree, and countless flowers. First, any advice on getting rid of them? We’ve been waiting for a freeze, but that seems hopeless. Now I would like to start growing vegetables, but am worried they will eat everything before we get a chance to. If I cannot get rid of them, how do I keep my garden safe?

  • I understand the iguana problem because when I lived in Plantation we had the same issue. First I will tell you what other Master Gardeners I knew did. One woman would trap them and drop them off at a pet store (and I’m sure eventually they found their way back to her yard). Other Master Gardeners would freeze them in either a cooler with ice or in their freezer. That was all too morbid for me. So, I made it as uncomfortable in my yard as I could for them. Sometimes I would get out my hose and spray them with a strong spray of water while yelling. Keep doing that enough and they will leave. I also had a stick and would get them to grab on and then send them on a gentle trip on the other side of my wall. I’d also chase them (usually up a tree). And it seemed to help and I never had an iguana eat my tomatoes. I felt like there was enough vegetation in the neighboring yards without the hassle that I gave them. Otherwise, consider moving somewhere colder and good luck!!

  • I know someone who did concrete block raised beds in South Florida and they had a lot of luck. Traditional wood raised beds would obviously rot sooner there so you might want to try that. As for young boys, I’ve had lots of success with green onions; the young boys I’ve worked with love to eat the green tips because it makes their breath smell. Also, radishes grow quickly as well as cherry tomatoes.

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